Results for Category: Lebanon

92 results found.
Samy Gemayel Third Generation to Head Lebanon’s Phalange Party

In April 2018, Gemayel said he was against a budget clause he claimed would benefit Syrian refugees looking to settle in Lebanon. Article 50 of the 2018 state budget grants residency to foreign nationals who buy an apartment of at least $500,000 in Beirut and $330,000 elsewhere. Gemayel has taken a similar stance on Palestinian refugees, opposing a proposal that would allow them to work and own property, saying it would be the first step to naturalizing them and therefore unconstitutional.

Lebanon’s ‘Kingmaker’ Walid Jumblatt is Keeping it in the Family

Following the beginning of the Syrian civil war in 2011, he claimed that the regime of President Bashar al-Assad was responsible for creating the radical jihadist al-Nusra Front. However, he remains politically active, despite confirming Taymour as his political heir in March 2017. For example, he blamed Saudi Arabia for the resignation of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri in November 2017.

Giving Hope and Goals to the Lebanese Youth to prevent Radicalization

The most famous example of a successful initiative to prevent radicalization in Lebanon is a project by the NGO MARCH in Tripoli. It started from 2014 and brought together young people from two rival neighborhoods: the Alawite minority from the Jabal Mohsen area and the Sunni community of Bab el-Tebbaneh. The groups, who live in poor quarters of the city, separated by Syria Street, are known for their sporadic clashes and armed battles in the streets of Tripoli.

In Lebanon, Balance of Power Shifts after Chaotic Elections

Hezbollah party and its allies won more than a third of the 128 seats, giving them veto power. Prime Minister Saad Hariri lost a third of his seats. Indeed, the strengthened position of Hezbollah’s bloc could have a long-term impact on Lebanese politics and society notably on the formation of the new government. It could also affect Lebanon’s access to loans and financial aid from the international community, and destabilize relations with the Gulf countries opposed to Syria and Iran.

New Lebanese Law Against Torture a Good but Incomplete Step

This law is a big step forward for Lebanon’s ability to prosecute cases of torture. This new law broadens the definition of torture, imposes stricter sentences of one to 20 years in prison, and establishes procedures for investigating torture. However, it does not fully comply with Lebanon’s international obligations, and Lebanon should amend the law to reflect the internationally recognized definition of torture.