Results for Category: Sudan

49 results found.
Security Sector Reform in Sudan: Opportunities and Challenges

Creating a military tasked with protecting citizens requires a new social contract that ensures security forces answer to civilian bodies and are respected but not feared.

The Ongoing Debate About The Biography, Career and Femininity of Singer Nada Al-Qalaa

In recent years, Al-Qalaa has endeavored not only to present herself as an artist whose main job is to sing, but she has also taken initiatives and participated in activities that contribute to public social work. This includes visiting the Sudanese victims of floods and rains in 2015, providing them with aid, performing concerts, the revenues of which went to the victims, and singing a song about them. In 2016, Al-Qalaa organized a campaign to support female tea vendors in the country’s capital, Khartoum, and expressed her sympathy for the “dardaqat” workers [porters], who earn a living by helping buyers in the market to carry their purchases in hand-driven vehicles.

Ibrahim El-Salahi, an Icon of Modern Arab-African Art

El-Salahi said that after he completed his studies in London, he was shocked to realize that the public had not appreciated his artistic works. He concluded that such a departure was because available art did not express the cultural legacy of the Sudanese people, prompting him to focus on the value of images in Sudanese culture.

Economy of Sudan

Sudan is a poor country, despite its potential resources. Sudan’s economy is basically agricultural, with inadequate infrastructure and ridden by civil wars and social and ethnic conflict. The government is attempting to develop non-petroleum sources of revenues, such as gold mining, while carrying out an austerity programme to reduce expenditures.

Sudanese Novelist Leila Aboulela Becomes International Figure Through Religion, Alienation

“I started writing from day one. I wanted to clarify the psychology and emotions of someone who has a religious creed. I was very interested in going deep, not just looking at Islam as a cultural or political identity, but as a more essential component. Therefore, faith in my literary works is deeper than identity and more important than gender, nationality, class or race. At the same time, I do not deny or overlook such elements.”