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Faces of Jordan

Hind al-Fayez and the Challenges for Reform in Jordan

An interview with Jordanian Member of Parliament Hind al-Fayez. Many observers in Jordan describe her as a "very active" lawmaker, an advocate for further political and economic reforms and a strong opponent of the Kingdom’s proposed nuclear programme.

02/06/2018
Marwan Muasher is the former deputy prime minister and foreign minister of Jordan. In the lectures he delivers and the debates he takes part in, Muasher criticizes the slow pace of reform, politically, economically, and socially, and he recently criticized the deterioration of higher education in the kingdom.
11/03/2018
He has been outspoken about the wave of fascism and religious radicalism around the world. He accused US President Donald Trump of breaking taboos by suggesting bringing back torture, and warned world powers against undermining civil liberties in the fight against terrorism. He criticized Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte’s support for extrajudicial killings, and British Prime Minister Theresa May’s threat to change human right laws if they got in the way of the war on terror.
05/07/2018
His first order of business was to withdraw the controversial tax bill when his cabinet, made up of a mix of old and new faces, was sworn in on 14 June. The more difficult task will be deciding what to replace the tax bill with, given Jordan’s economic woes and dependency on international financial institutions.

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