Results for Tag: HumanRights

239 results found.
Rachid Nekkaz, Algeria’s Unconventional Politician

Rachid Nekkaz, algerian businessman, activist and former presidential candidate, is one of the few opposition leaders who currently enjoy popularity among young voters. His unconventional initiatives have not only positioned him as a man of the people, they have also increased his understanding of Algerian society, countering frequent criticisms that he is a rich, out-of-touch foreigner. However, many doubted his intentions, given his lack of success in French politics, and accused him of being out of touch with the realities of ordinary Algerians.

The Blacklist: Saudi Arabia’s High-profile Political Detainees

Samah Hadid, the deputy director of Amnesty International, said that most human rights activists in the country were either in prison or on trial, their whereabouts still undisclosed. The others, she added, risk arrest at any time. MBS is clearly remaking Saudi Arabia in his image, while proving to be just as authoritarian as the rulers before him.

Social Unrest in Tunisia: When the Expected Becomes Unexpected

Historically, January has been the month of social unrest: from the infamous bread riots in January 1984, to the revolution in January 2011 and the protests over high unemployment in January 2016. Although all of them were violently suppressed, most resulted in major regime change, whether it be ousters, resignations, or in one case, exile. What it will be this time around only time will tell.

Ahmet Sik: Punished for Telling the Truth

It appears that not even prison can make Sik compromise his ideals. In his opening court statement, which he gave on 26 July 2017, he blasted Erdogan for persecuting those who think for themselves. He then declared that journalism is not a crime despite what the rulers of totalitarian regimes, their judiciaries and collaborators may say.

New Lebanese Law Against Torture a Good but Incomplete Step

This law is a big step forward for Lebanon’s ability to prosecute cases of torture. This new law broadens the definition of torture, imposes stricter sentences of one to 20 years in prison, and establishes procedures for investigating torture. However, it does not fully comply with Lebanon’s international obligations, and Lebanon should amend the law to reflect the internationally recognized definition of torture.

Rainbow Flag at Concert Infuriates Egyptians, Sparks Calls for Gay Clampdown

The extremely rare public display of support for gay rights was followed by calls in the media for the government and religious authorities to come to the rescue of a society dangerously poised on the brink of the moral abyss by legislating against homosexuality or invoking religion to condemn the deviants (al-shawath), the pejorative term used to describe homosexuals in Egypt and other Arabic-speaking societies.