Results for Tag: Syrian refugees

29 results found.
Why the Media needs to be more Responsible for how it Links Islam and Islamist Terrorism

As a study conducted at the University of Vienna in 2017 confirmed, media coverage that does not explicitly distinguish between Muslims and Islamist terrorists fuels hostile attitudes toward the general Muslim population. With growing awareness of the impact of this kind of reporting, some media outlets like CNN have tried to distinguish between “moderate Islam” and “radical Islam”, “Islam” and “Islamic extremism”.

In Iraq, Heavy Metal is Considered the Devil’s Music

Dark Phantom tackles issues such as political and religious corruption. “We see them as the root causes of all the problems in our country,” vocalist Mir Shamal said. “By addressing these subjects, we hope that people will become more aware and help overcome these problems.” But their music also creates problems, he acknowledged: “[It] is not popular but rather hated and infamous. It’s considered the music of the devil,”

Samy Gemayel Third Generation to Head Lebanon’s Phalange Party

In April 2018, Gemayel said he was against a budget clause he claimed would benefit Syrian refugees looking to settle in Lebanon. Article 50 of the 2018 state budget grants residency to foreign nationals who buy an apartment of at least $500,000 in Beirut and $330,000 elsewhere. Gemayel has taken a similar stance on Palestinian refugees, opposing a proposal that would allow them to work and own property, saying it would be the first step to naturalizing them and therefore unconstitutional.

Syria: No Room for Political Compromise

The Syrian regime wanted to stay in power at all costs, whereas the opposition wanted to topple the regime with the help of foreign military and political support, and kept insisting that this was its aim, even after it was on the verge of losing the war. The opposing political positions remained too far apart for any real negotiations to be able to be successful. Apparently, there was not any mediating party that was able to induce either side to moderate its position so as to be able to reach a compromise. Both sides considered it to be a struggle for life or death with hardly any room for compromise. With the increase of the numbers of deadly victims, refugees and destruction, the room for compromise – if there had ever been any room for compromise in the first place – ceased to exist.

In Syria, 2 Million Children No Longer Attending School

There are around 2.5 million Syrian children displaced by the war living in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. Host countries have taken steps to increase school enrollment, such as offering free public education and introducing ‘second shifts’ in the afternoons to accommodate more children. Yet barriers such as onerous documentation requirements, language difficulties and a lack of affordable transportation are continuing to keep children out of the classroom, according to HRW.

Lebanon’s ‘Kingmaker’ Walid Jumblatt is Keeping it in the Family

Following the beginning of the Syrian civil war in 2011, he claimed that the regime of President Bashar al-Assad was responsible for creating the radical jihadist al-Nusra Front. However, he remains politically active, despite confirming Taymour as his political heir in March 2017. For example, he blamed Saudi Arabia for the resignation of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri in November 2017.

Jordanian protests: Revisiting the Arab Spring and setting a Benchmark

Erosion of middle class incomes, discontent with quality of life, the shortage of formal sector jobs, and corruption rather than poverty and income inequality were at the root of the protests. However, King Abdullah’s willingness and ability to implement change is being put to the test.

In Jordan, Protestors Take to Streets Over Tax Reform Bill

Unions called a general strike on 30 May 2018, with 33 associations representing a broad cross section of industries participating. The strike was followed by days of mass protests in cities across the country. Protesters blocked roads, and burned tires and garbage cans. Police fired tear gas to prevent protesters getting near to the cabinet office in Amman, and scuffles broke out between protesters and police in some areas.